Hubungan antara Fungsi Adaptif Mendengarkan Musik dengan Academic Buoyancy pada Mahasiswa Emerging Adulthood

  • Meidy Christianty Soesanto Fakultas Psikologi Universitas Surabaya, Kalingrungkut, Surabaya 60293 ‐ Indonesia
  • Andrian Pramadi Fakultas Psikologi Universitas Surabaya, Kalingrungkut, Surabaya 60293 ‐ Indonesia
  • Mary Philia Elisabeth Fakultas Psikologi Universitas Surabaya, Kalingrungkut, Surabaya 60293 ‐ Indonesia
Abstract Views: 32 PDF Downloads: 28
Keywords: fungsi adaptif mendengarkan musik, academic buoyancy, mahasiswa aktif, emerging adulthood, adaptive function of music listening, academic buoyancy, active college student, emerging adulthood

Abstract

Abstrak-- Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui hubungan antara fungsi adaptif mendengarkan musik dengan academic buoyancy pada mahasiswa emerging adulthood. Sebanyak 257 mahasiswa/i aktif berusia 18-25 tahun dipilih menggunakan probability sampling menjadi partisipan dalam penelitian ini. Penelitian ini menggunakan pendekatan kuantitatif dan kuisioner on-line. Alat ukur yang digunakan adalah Adaptive Function of Music Listening scale (AFMLS) dan Academic Buoyancy Scale (ABS). Hasil uji hipotesis non-parametrik menemukan adanya hubungan positif yang signifikan antara fungsi adaptif mendengarkan musik dengan academic buoyancy berdasarkan spearman (p = 0.030; r = 0.135). Pada uji korelasi antar aspek fungsi adaptif mendengarkan musik, terdapat hubungan antara regulasi stres dengan academic buoyancy (p = 0.019; r = 0.129). Aspek pengalaman emosional yang kuat dengan academic buoyancy (p = 0.030; r = 0.117). Tidak terdapat hubungan antara aspek regulasi kognitif dengan academic buoyancy (p = 0.066; r = 0.094). Kesimpulan penelitian ini adalah mendengarkan musik secara adaptif dapat membantu meningkatkan academic buoyancy mahasiswa. Saran penelitian selanjutnya adalah menambahkan pertanyaan mengenai analisis lirik dan mengukur faktor-faktor yang bisa mempengaruhi academic buoyancy.

Kata kunci: fungsi adaptif mendengarkan musik, academic buoyancy, mahasiswa aktif, emerging adulthood

Abstract-- This study aims to determine the relationship between adaptive function of music listening with academic buoyancy on emerging adulthood college students. 257 active college students aged 18-25 years were selected using probability sampling to be participants in this study. This study uses a quantitative approach and on-line questionnaire. The measuring instruments used are Adaptive Function of Music Listening scale (AFMLS) and Academic Buoyancy Scale (ABS). The results of the non-parametric hypothesis test found that there was a significant positive relationship between adaptive listening music functions and spearman academic buoyancy (p = 0.030; r = 0.135). In the correlation test between the adaptive function aspects of listening to music, there is a relationship between stress regulation and academic buoyancy (p = 0.019; r = 0.129). Strong emotional experience aspects with academic buoyancy (p = 0.030; r = 0.117). There was no relationship between aspects of cognitive regulation with academic buoyancy (p = 0.066; r = 0.094). Conclusion of this study is that listening to music in an adaptive way can help college students improve their academic buoyancy. Suggestion for further research is to add questions about lyric analysis and measure factors that can influence academic buoyancy.

Keywords: adaptive function of music listening, academic buoyancy, active college student, emerging adulthood

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Published
2020-05-31